Dating abuse billboards

Elliot, 51, a former Philadelphia Parking Authority enforcement officer from Fox Chase, has been on workers’ comp for about seven years.He went to Pond Lehocky after falling on the job and sustaining a herniated disc, which led to several other medical ailments.“Since you can’t do it directly from your office, they set up these pharmacies that are separate entities but obviously related,” Mackenzie said.In October, Pond Lehocky got in the game with its own pharmacy, putting a new twist on the business model.The application stated that no medical practitioners had a proprietary interest in the pharmacy.But, in fact, several doctors are part-owners, the Inquirer and Daily News have learned.Elliot said Purewal sent the script directly to Workers First.The new medicine seemed to work at first, Elliot said, but now it doesn’t do anything. “But it doesn’t last long.” Records show that Workers First has charged more than

Elliot, 51, a former Philadelphia Parking Authority enforcement officer from Fox Chase, has been on workers’ comp for about seven years.He went to Pond Lehocky after falling on the job and sustaining a herniated disc, which led to several other medical ailments.“Since you can’t do it directly from your office, they set up these pharmacies that are separate entities but obviously related,” Mackenzie said.In October, Pond Lehocky got in the game with its own pharmacy, putting a new twist on the business model.The application stated that no medical practitioners had a proprietary interest in the pharmacy.But, in fact, several doctors are part-owners, the Inquirer and Daily News have learned.Elliot said Purewal sent the script directly to Workers First.The new medicine seemed to work at first, Elliot said, but now it doesn’t do anything. “But it doesn’t last long.” Records show that Workers First has charged more than $1,600 for a 5-ounce bottle of diclofenac.

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Elliot, 51, a former Philadelphia Parking Authority enforcement officer from Fox Chase, has been on workers’ comp for about seven years.

He went to Pond Lehocky after falling on the job and sustaining a herniated disc, which led to several other medical ailments.

“Since you can’t do it directly from your office, they set up these pharmacies that are separate entities but obviously related,” Mackenzie said.

In October, Pond Lehocky got in the game with its own pharmacy, putting a new twist on the business model.

The application stated that no medical practitioners had a proprietary interest in the pharmacy.

But, in fact, several doctors are part-owners, the Inquirer and Daily News have learned.

Elliot said Purewal sent the script directly to Workers First.

The new medicine seemed to work at first, Elliot said, but now it doesn’t do anything. “But it doesn’t last long.” Records show that Workers First has charged more than $1,600 for a 5-ounce bottle of diclofenac.

,600 for a 5-ounce bottle of diclofenac.

Three partners at the firm and its chief financial officer are majority owners of a mail-order pharmacy in the Philadelphia suburbs that has teamed up with a secretive network of doctors that prescribes unproven and exorbitantly priced pain creams to injured workers — some creams costing more than ,000 per tube.

He also writes Clout, a weekly Daily News column chronicling the underbelly of Philly's political scene.

Pond Lehocky is the biggest player in town for workers’ compensation cases, targeting employees who get hurt on the job with TV ads and billboards that seem to loom on every stretch of Philadelphia’s highways.

“It appears what’s happening is, the attorneys looked at mail-order pharmacies and said, ‘Heck, we can capture all that profit ourselves’ with this sort of parasitic relationship with the attorneys referring patients to specific doctors,” Paduda said.

On its website, Pond Lehocky is vague about its relationship to Workers First, saying it is “partnering” with the pharmacy to help clients get the best pharmaceutical care.