Rubidium dating

But in general, this rate is felt by the vast majority of mainstream scientists to be a fundamental constant. al., published a paper suggesting that the decay rate of radioactive elements is related to the Earth's distance from the Sun.In other words, the decay rates show annual changes that closely reflect the Earth's distance from the Sun (see illustration).He believed this even though he did admit that some heat might be generated by the tidal forces or by chemical action.

This just goes to show that just because independent estimates of age seem to agree with each other doesn't mean that they're correct - despite the fact that this particular argument is the very same one used to support the validity of radiometric dating today.

Of course, the detected variation is no more than 0.2% of the published rates, but this paper is still quite interesting since such a correlation was never suspected before.

If magnetic fluxuations or other influencing forces are strong enough, radiometric decay rates could be much more significantly effected.

Based on these assumptions he at first suggested an age of the Earth of between 100 Ma and 500 Ma.

This estimate was actually reduced over his lifetime to between 20 Ma and 40 Ma and eventually to less than 10 Ma. Perry, in particular, a noted physicists and former assistant to Kelvin, showed that cooling calculations using different but equally likely assumptions and data resulted in ages for the Earth of as much as 29 Ga.