Speed dating saint john new brunswick

It moved its facilities downstream on the River Wear to Pallion in 1857. She did, however, raise the general alarm as to Elm Branch's predicament. It was a 'Puget Sound Tugboat Company' tug however, Tyee I believe, one of two tugs (Tacoma was the other) that attended the scene, that brought Elm Branch safely to Seattle, being later awarded ,500 for her efforts by a Seattle court. 1919 the vessel was sold to to Polish-American Navigation Corp.', of New York, & renamed Wisla. Borrowstounness, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to be broken up.

Pallion, is, I understand, upstream of the present rail & road bridges in central Sunderland, the shipbuilding yard being located (or I should say located since all shipbuilding ended there in 1988) on the south side of the river close to (west of) the Queen Alexandra Bridge - about 3 miles from the mouth of the river. A series of later sales one after the other - in 1922 to Wisla Steamship Corp., of New York, in 1923 to Wabash Steamship Corp., also of New York or maybe of Delaware. And then, in 1924, to 'Jensen Linien Aktieselskab', (H. Evans & Co., of London, & renamed Purley Beeches - though there may have been a sale ahead of that one, to 'D/S Codan'. Gethring, of Aberavon, was her captain for a number of years from Ellen Jensen thru to Purley Beeches.

Graham of Tulsa, Oklahoma) and the many pages available at the 'Doxford Engine Friends Association' website, available through this page. , signal letters (as Ellen Jensen) NFRJ, accommodation for 3 passengers.

I do not know the name of the business when it was first established - maybe just 'William Doxford'?

Now to build 25 or so vessels in a year & produce a total of 100,000 tons means that most of them were probably vessels of about 4/5,000 tons each. A kind visitor to this site has provided an amazing amount of data to the webmaster about Sunderland shipbuilders & their ships. I have not provided images on site of the 4 pages since they might be of interest to relatively few site visitors. The image above is of a most interesting item indeed. I now see that members of the Doxford family rejoined the company in 1922 - as senior officials or as managers. Built for 'Hudig & Veder's Stoomvaart Maats' (Hudig & Veder, managers), of Rotterdam, Netherlands, & Rotterdam registered.

And amongst that data is a 'Report to the Shareholders' of 'William Doxford and Sons, Limited', respecting a meeting of Ordinary Shareholders held on March 11, 1907. Images of Doxford family members prominent in the history of the shipbuilding company can be seen here, in a page from a 1922 promotional booklet published by the company. The tiny white area in the middle at the bottom is a cog wheel & when it is rotated the pistons go up and down! After WW1, orders for new ships dried up, & Doxfords closed down from September 1924 to April 1927. I read that in 1946, the company took over the Palmer's Hill, Sunderland, engine works of John Dickinson & Sons Ltd.

176 (or maybe 177) 'turret ships' (one authoritative site says 184) were built by Doxford in the years through to 1911. The storm continued to rage & the ship was soon driven inland to just 20 yards from the shore.

I should mention, however, that the Queen Alexandra Bridge was not there in 1870. Do read the most interesting information available here, (the website of George H. 103.6 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 340 ft., speed? Mainly from that first website we learn that William Theodore Doxford (1841-1916) & his brother Alfred (1842-1895) joined their father in the shipbuilding business & that both were partners by 1875. Perhaps at that point the company would have become 'W. Robert (1851-1932) & Charles (1856-1935), two younger sons also followed into the firm. ) states that the vessel was then owned by 'Mac Kenzie & Mann' of Montreal (I had read that in 1907, the vessel was owned by Canadian Lake & Ocean Navigation Co. The reorganisation was in progress as ships were continuously being built. The vessel was laid up in 1913, & in 1914 was sold to White Cross Steamship Co. The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. long, 78.75 or 78.8 metres, perpendicular to perpendicular. Also in 1906, the vessel was in collision with the steamer Pyrgos. 4, 1910, the vessel was sunk off Pendeen Light, Land's End, while on tow, in ballast, by Belgian tug John Bull, from Antwerp to Port Talbot, Glamorgan, South Wales. (Jack) Nelson, an apprentice, was the only survivor. 'Suffered a broken tail shaft when rounding Cape Horn in her year of build and had to be towed to Montevideo by the steamer Gulf of Corcovado.' Known, it would seem, as 'New Zealand Thief'! Very little seems to be WWW available about this vessel. The launch of the vessel was covered in 'Marine Engineer ...' of Jan. Do read the story at 1 'Possibly The Greatest Ever Repair at Sea.' (sheared propeller shaft in Feb. 1890 arrival at Hobart), 5 (Huddart, Parker & Co., 55% down), 6 & 7 (loss of Federal, partial crew lists), 8 & 9 (wreck data, Federal), 10 (4 images, Federal), 11 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). It must then be that it foundered at or near Bikar Atoll. A self-powered 'whaleback' ship (most of them were towed barges). 1 indicates vessel was built under licence from Alexander Mc Dougall (1845-1923, a Scottish born Great Lakes ship's master from Duluth, Minnesota). Sagamore, & then went on to develop its own series of 'turret' ships, similar in appearance to a 'whaleback' but with one continuous turret rather than individual turrets. A schooner rigged 'turret' steamer, the 2nd ship built to such design. Per 1 (a splendid illustrated article, Turret Age, at pages 200/222), 2 (1898 collision, Lloyd S. Porter), 4 (New York Times archive, 1898 ice flow damage), 5 (1900 wreck report, Turret Age), 6 (1902 wreck report, Firth of Forth), 7 (1903 wreck report, Firth of Forth), 8 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). But clearly my understanding may be wrong, or incomplete. And it would seem they were awarded also a similar sum in a claim against Turret Steam Shipping Company Ltd. To fill again, perhaps in bad weather, & sink the next day. The court found the Captain to be in default for failing to verify the vessel's position in relation to the 3 visible lights. Tate's licence was suspended for 6 months & Brady was censored i) for his lack of action re the compass errors & ii) for setting the dangerous course thru Rebecca Channel when a safer course was available. 25, 1903, while en route from Hamburg, Germany, to Vladivostok, Russia, (Sea of Japan), with a general cargo, the vessel foundered 25 miles off Cape Bengut, (near Algiers), Algeria. The court was not satisfied with the manner in which both the captain & Arthur Tate gave evidence. Built for George Horsley & Son, (or per Lloyds List G. In 1899, the vessel became a 'Horsley Line Ltd.' vessel, with M. The vessel 'often carried coal out/timber home (Baltic) although she was to be found in Trieste/ New Orleans and east coast of the USA'. The flow of steel was improved using flow-line principles & a new steel stockyard was constructed. Penzance steamer India, of 364 tons, ran into the starboard side of Kate Thomas at 4 a.m. The vessel sank a few minutes (10 or 15) after the collision. 1900 while en route in ballast from Mauritius to Colombo, Ceylon, (now Sri Lanka). coast of Great Nicobar Island in bad weather en route Penang/Calcutta (or Madras) with cargo & passengers. 88.4 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 290 ft., two masts, schooner rigged, speed of 10 or maybe 11 knots. Built to serve the Newcastle, New South Wales ('NSW'), Australia, & Melbourne coal trade. 1898 the vessel was chartered to Adelaide Steamship Co. Coull in command, with a crew of 30 all told (have also read 21, 29 & 37), left Port Kembla, NSW, bound for Albany, Western Australia, with a cargo of coal. The available data re this vessel is, to me at least, confused. While 2 used to state that the Doxford vessel was unapproved & therefore built under licence. 94.8 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 311.0 ft., speed of about 11 knots, with engines aft, signal letters NDWP. She was refloated on the 29th, sank again on the 30th & was abandoned on Oct. It would seem likely that the vessel was deliberately scuttled. Stevenson), 2 (data Caroline Hemsoth), 3 (Lloyds), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).

Speed dating saint john new brunswick