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The ford was most likely located where the main road crossed the river.

New Brentford is recorded as Newe Braynford in 1521 and was previously known as Westbraynford.

Although Cæsar's descriptions are compelling, there has been no archaeological proof that this was the spot where he and his army had to fight to cross.

It must also be kept in mind that Julius Cæsar's own accounts suffered in some part to his embellishment of the facts.

) is a town in west London, England, historic county town of Middlesex and part of the London Borough of Hounslow, at the confluence of the River Brent and the Thames, 8 miles (13 km) west-by-southwest of Charing Cross. Its economy has diverse company headquarters buildings which mark the start of the M4 corridor; in transport it also has two railway stations and Boston Manor Underground station on its north-west border with Hanwell.

Brentford has a convenience shopping and dining venue grid of streets at its centre.

Many pre-Roman artifacts have been excavated in and around the area in Brentford known as 'Old England'.

Bronze Age pottery and burnt flints have been found in separate sites in Brentford.

A notable family from Brentford was the 18th/19th century architectural father and son partnership, the Hardwicks.

Brentford developed around the ancient boundary between the parishes of Ealing and Hanwell.

It was divided between the chapelry of Old Brentford to the east in Ealing and the chapelry of New Brentford in Hanwell to the west.

Brentford is the first point on the tidal portion of the River Thames which was easily fordable by foot (this was before dredging took place).

Partly for this reason it has been suggested that Julius Cæsar crossed the Thames here during his invasion of Britain in 54 BC, and the Brentford Monument outside the County Court asserts that a battle took place here at this time between Cæsar's forces and Cassivellaunus.