Coke can dating

Amber-colored bottles, sold widely in the South and Midwest, tend to be more valuable than the clear or light green or flint straight-sided bottles that were more common in other parts of the country.

Flavor Bottles Before The Company created a line of flavored drinks, most of the bottlers created their own brands, with orange, root beer, strawberry, grape and fruit-flavored drinks.

I probably receive more questions about bottles than any other single item, simply because they are what most people find.

Often someone will dig up a contour or "hobble skirt" bottle from the 1920s and immediately assume they've struck gold.

The only differences from 1915 to present day for embossed bottles are changes in the trademark registration notice and patent notice on the bottles.

Because they were not allowed to put them in bottles with the "Coca-Cola" script, the bottlers developed their own "flavor bottles." The writing on many of these bottles indicates they are property of the local Company sold its syrup to soda fountains, where it was mixed with carbonated water in proper proportions before serving the drink to customers.

The syrup bottles were ornately etched and equipped with a metal cap for precise serving.

(11th Edition) lists a 1916 embossed contour bottle that sells for just to .

To a novice collector, it's almost a case of reverse sticker shock. Because the embossed contour bottles were mass produced, exceptionally durable and available for more than 40 years, they generally have modest values as collectibles.