What is Egyptian art

SWG Art dictionary


ARTWORKS EGYPTIAN PAINTING


Agricultural scenes from threshing, granaries, with sickle harvest, digging, pruning and plowing, observed from night | This work is in the public domain because its copyright has expired | from Wikimedia Commons, the free media archive

 

DEFINITION EGYPTIAN PAINTING


In a narrower sense, Egyptian painting encompasses the painting of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs, that is, the period from 3000 BC to 395 AD. Before this period of more than 3000 years, the known testimonies go back to the 5th millennium BC. The evidence of this little-known, prehistoric period shows rock paintings and paintings that illustrate a striving for a realistic, realistic and holistic representation of the human being, which is characteristic of all Egyptian art. Three-dimensional bodies are represented two-dimensionally in the image in a way that characterizes the representation. The head is painted in profile, but the eyes are arranged so that they look directly and frontally at the viewer. The upper body then follows this principle, which, in contrast to the legs and feet (which are then again shown in a step position in the profile), are shown in a frontal view. The Egyptian painters adhere to this typical and unmistakable representation. Presumably, the consolidation of the representation and the unmistakable artistic style, over this unbelievable period of time, is closely related to the natural landscape shaped by the Nile and the lesser external cultural influences.

We owe the realistic Egyptian painting to the fact that these were mainly dedicated to the pharaoh families and the high-ranking officials who were honored as gods on earth. The paintings in the burial chambers fulfilled cultic and religious functions. But the normal courtly and everyday life was also shown. In the hereafter, the highly revered persons should be surrounded by all the things that had surrounded them during their lifetime.

The second major subject area of ​​Egyptian painting, partly preserved on papyri, is religiously determined in the younger dynasties. Here the Egyptian gods and often the judgment of the dead are depicted, which, compared to Christian depictions, shows clear parallels with the motif of the weighing of souls.

 

 

 

 


ARTWORKS EGYPTIAN PAINTING


Agricultural scenes from threshing, granaries, with sickle harvest, digging, pruning and plowing, observed from night | This work is in the public domain because its copyright has expired | from Wikimedia Commons, the free media archive

 

DEFINITION EGYPTIAN PAINTING


In a narrower sense, Egyptian painting encompasses the painting of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs, that is, the period from 3000 BC to 395 AD. Before this period of more than 3000 years, the known testimonies go back to the 5th millennium BC. The evidence of this little-known, prehistoric period shows rock paintings and paintings that illustrate a striving for a realistic, realistic and holistic representation of the human being, which is characteristic of all Egyptian art. Three-dimensional bodies are represented two-dimensionally in the image in a way that characterizes the representation. The head is painted in profile, but the eyes are arranged so that they look directly and frontally at the viewer. The upper body then follows this principle, which, in contrast to the legs and feet (which are then again shown in a step position in the profile), are shown in a frontal view. The Egyptian painters adhere to this typical and unmistakable representation. Presumably, the consolidation of the representation and the unmistakable artistic style, over this unbelievable period of time, is closely related to the natural landscape shaped by the Nile and the lesser external cultural influences.

We owe the realistic Egyptian painting to the fact that these were mainly dedicated to the pharaoh families and the high-ranking officials who were honored as gods on earth. The paintings in the burial chambers fulfilled cultic and religious functions. But the normal courtly and everyday life was also shown. In the hereafter, the highly revered persons should be surrounded by all the things that had surrounded them during their lifetime.

The second major subject area of ​​Egyptian painting, partly preserved on papyri, is religiously determined in the younger dynasties. Here the Egyptian gods and often the judgment of the dead are depicted, which, compared to Christian depictions, shows clear parallels with the motif of the weighing of souls.

 

 

 

 


ARTWORKS EGYPTIAN PAINTING


Agricultural scenes from threshing, granary, sickle harvest, digging, pruning and plowing, observed from night | This work is in the public domain because its copyright has expired | from Wikimedia Commons, the free media archive

 

DEFINITION EGYPTIAN PAINTING


In a narrower sense, Egyptian painting encompasses the painting of the ancient Egyptian pharaohs, that is, the period from 3000 BC to 395 AD. Before this period of more than 3000 years, the known testimonies go back to the 5th millennium BC. The evidence of this little-known, prehistoric period shows rock paintings and paintings that illustrate a striving for a realistic, realistic and holistic representation of the human being, which is characteristic of all Egyptian art. Three-dimensional bodies are represented two-dimensionally in the image in a way that characterizes the representation. The head is painted in profile, but the eyes are arranged so that they look directly and frontally at the viewer. The upper body then follows this principle, which, in contrast to the legs and feet (which are then again shown in a step position in the profile), are shown in a frontal view. The Egyptian painters adhere to this typical and unmistakable representation. Presumably, the consolidation of the representation and the unmistakable artistic style, over this unbelievable period of time, is closely related to the natural landscape shaped by the Nile and the lesser external cultural influences.

We owe the realistic Egyptian painting to the fact that these were primarily dedicated to the pharaoh families and the high-ranking officials who were honored as gods on earth. The paintings in the burial chambers fulfilled cultic and religious functions. But the normal courtly and everyday life was also shown. In the hereafter, the highly revered persons should be surrounded by all the things that surrounded them during their lifetime.

The second major subject area of ​​Egyptian painting, partly preserved on papyri, is religiously determined in the younger dynasties. Here the Egyptian gods and often the judgment of the dead are depicted, which, compared to Christian depictions, shows clear parallels with the motif of the weighing of souls.