Is Sikhism better

Holiday of the Sikh community - With the Sikhs, everyone is king

Jump to content
  1. Culture
  2. Society & Religion
  3. Current article
content

The Sikhs celebrate their most important festival these days. About 500 of them live in Switzerland, their religion is alien to many in this country. What is Sikhism?

The essentials in brief:

  • in the 15th century the Guru Nanak built the first Sikh temple. There he announced his vision of one universal brotherhood.
  • Worldwide there are about 25 million Sikhs, in Switzerland there are around 500.
  • Most noticeable features of the Sikhs are Beard and turban. The turban is a constant cause of discussion among Sikhs.

His words are more relevant than ever: "There are no Hindus, there are no Muslims, there are only creatures of God", taught Guru Nanak in the 15th century.

Dissatisfied with the conditions prevailing at the time, in which the various religious communities were fighting each other, he traveled all over India as an itinerant preacher and reached Mecca and Medina. He prayed, meditated, and proclaimed his vision of universal brotherhood.

Finally he settled as a farmer with his family in Kartarpur, today in the Pakistani part of Punjab, and built the first Sikh temple there.

Guru Nanak, who was born a Hindu, rejected the caste system and secular asceticism. However, he advocated rebirth and taught an imageless monotheism.

The five K

Only through the following nine gurus did Sikhism gradually change from a reform movement to an independent religion. The tenth and last guru, Gobind Singh, carried out a baptism ceremony for the first time on the Vaisakhi harvest festival in 1699, thereby initiating the Khalsa brotherhood.

Khalsa, the "pure", are a kind of holy soldiers who should defend themselves against the numerous external and internal threats. They were obliged to wear the five Ks: uncut hair (kesh), wooden comb (kangha), sword (kirpan), steel bracelet (kara), knee-length underpants (kachera).

Guru Gobind Singh declared women and men to be equal. From then on, all male Sikhs bore the surname Singh (lion) and all women Kaur (prince).

Read aloud for two days and two nights

Guru Granth Sahib is the sacred book of the Sikhs and is venerated as the eleventh Guru, a living spiritual master. The book is placed on pillows under a canopy and wrapped in silk cloths and laid to rest during the night.

What is unusual and surprising about this book is that it contains not only the teachings of the Sikh gurus, but also those of Muslim and Hindu saints.

On special occasions such as Vaisakhi, the full edition of the book is read without interruption for two days and two nights.

Three churches in Switzerland

In addition to this scripture, which is considered the highest authority, the Harimandir Temple is the most important Sikh sanctuary. It is known as the Golden Temple of Amritsar and is located in the northern Indian state of Punjab.

Sikhism has around 25 million followers worldwide, the majority of whom live in India. Switzerland has only about 500 Sikhs.

They used to meet in rented rooms or old factory halls, today there are three Gurdwaras: in Langenthal, Däniken and Bassersdorf. Gurdwara or Gurudwara, as the Sikhs call their place of worship, means "gate of the guru". Sikh means disciple and guru teacher or master.

Everyone is king

The Sikhs are well integrated in Switzerland. When it comes to the subject of turban, they experience it differently. Amandeep Singh from Langenthal, for example, would not mind wearing a turban if it were possible for work.

He would then be the first Swiss bus driver to wear a turban. On the other hand, he thinks it doesn't matter how you look. You can be a good Sikh with or without a turban.

Jaideep Singh from Thun is a designer and sees it differently. Even if he is sometimes stared at and has already been called a Taliban, he wears a turban. Because this has an important symbolic meaning: “In the past, kings wore a turban, like a crown. With us it doesn't matter which caste someone belongs to, everyone is king and everyone is looked at the same way. I want to support this approach to life. "

Broadcast: SRF 1, pictures for the holiday, April 18, 2017, 10:20 p.m.

  1. Culture
  2. Society & Religion
  3. Current article

Most read articles

Scroll left Scroll right

Social login

For the registration we need additional information about yourself.

{* #socialRegistrationForm *} {* firstName *} {* lastName *} {* emailAddress *} {* displayName *} {* mobile *} {* addressCity *} {* / socialRegistrationForm *}

Welcome back

Please log in to enter a comment.

{* loginWidget *} Use a different account

Login and register


Log In

{* #signInForm *} {* signInEmailAddress *} {* currentPassword *} Forgot your password? {* / signInForm *}

Simply log in with your social media account or your Apple ID

{* loginWidget *}

Create a new password

Enter the email address of your user account. We will then send you a link that you can use to create a new password.

{* #forgotPasswordForm *} {* signInEmailAddress *} {* / forgotPasswordForm *}

Create a new password

You will shortly receive an email with a link to renew your password.

Didn't get a message?

If you have not received an e-mail after 10 minutes, please check your SPAM folder and the details of your e-mail address.

Welcome back

Please log in to enter a comment.

{* #signInForm *} {* signInEmailAddress *} {* currentPassword *} Forgot your password? {* / signInForm *} Use a different account

Technical error

Oh oops! A technical issue occured. Please try again later or contact our customer service.

Confirm mobile number

So that you can enter a comment, we ask you to confirm your mobile number. We will send you an SMS code to the mobile number.

There has been an error. Please try again or contact our customer service.

Too many codes have already been requested for the mobile number. The function is blocked to prevent misuse.

Too many attempts. Please request a new code or contact our customer service.

Change mobile number

Too many attempts. Please request a new code or contact our customer service.

This mobile number is already in use. Please change your mobile number or contact our customer service.

Change mobile number

The maximum number of codes for the specified number has been reached. No more codes can be created.

Confirm email address

We have sent you an email at the address {* emailAddressData *} Posted. Please check your e-mail inbox and confirm your account using the activation link you received.

Didn't get a message?

If you have not received an e-mail after 10 minutes, please check your SPAM folder and the details of your e-mail address.

Adjust user data

{* resendLink *}

Register and login


to register

With an SRF account, you have the option of entering comments on our website and in the SRF app.

{* #registrationForm *} {* firstName *} {* lastName *} {* emailAddress *} {* displayName *} {* mobile *} {* addressCity *} {* newPassword *} {* newPasswordConfirm *} {* / registrationForm *}

Confirm email address

We have sent you an email at the address {* emailAddressData *} Posted. Please check your e-mail inbox and confirm your account using the activation link you received.

Didn't get a message?

If you have not received an e-mail after 10 minutes, please check your SPAM folder and the details of your e-mail address.

Adjust user data

{* resendLink *}

Your activation email has been sent

Please check your e-mail inbox. The activation email has been sent.

Verified email address

Thank you for verifying your email address.

user account

In this view you can manage your user data.

{* savedProfileMessage *} {* / editProfileForm *}

Change Password

Deactivate account

User data saved successfully

You can view your data in your user account at any time.


Adjust user data

Change Password

Define a new password for your account {* emailAddressData *}.

{* #changePasswordForm *} {* currentPassword *} {* newPassword *} {* newPasswordConfirm *} {* / changePasswordForm *}

Create a new password

Define a new password for your account.

{* #changePasswordFormNoAuth *} {* newPassword *} {* newPasswordConfirm *} {* / changePasswordFormNoAuth *}

Password saved successfully

You can now log in to the article with your new password.

Create a new password

We did not recognize the code to reset the password. Please re-enter your email address so that we can send you a new link.

{* #resetPasswordForm *} {* signInEmailAddress *} {* / resetPasswordForm *}

Create a new password

You will shortly receive an email with a link to renew your password.

Didn't get a message?

If you have not received an e-mail after 10 minutes, please check your SPAM folder and the details of your e-mail address.

Deactivate account

Your account will be deactivated and you will not be able to reactivate it. Recorded comments are not deleted.

Do you really want to deactivate your account?

{* deactivateAccountForm *} {* / deactivateAccountForm *}

Account deactivated

Your account has been deactivated and can no longer be used.
If you would like to register again for the comment function, please contact SRF customer service.

  • Comment from Nicolas Dudle (Nicolas Dudle)
    In my opinion, such contributions not only belong in the little-noticed "Panorama" forum, but also have to be placed more prominently.
    Agree agree to the comment
  • Comment from Leo Degelo (Leo Degelo)
    Thank you SRF for this very informative contribution and, above all, thank you to all Sikhs for a religion where everyone is welcome, there are no castes and men and women have equal rights! I think these approaches are very important and good in our global political climate today.
    Agree agree to the comment
  • Comment from Rolf Künzi (undefined)
    Like all religions, Sikism has one main and many secondary influences. Some lexical articles and publications see the origins of Sikhism in the Bhakti movement, Sufism, Sant Mat or Vishnuism. Others assume that Guru Nanak and his successors established a syncretism of Hindu and Islamic traditions. This view was mainly established by Western orientalists and Brahmin scholars in the 19th and 20th centuries.
    Agree agree to the comment

Footer


Metanavigation