What makes a great physicist

The big questions - physics

Similar to his book "The light used to be faster", the author succeeds in expressing himself on the fundamental and repeatedly asked questions of physics and cosmology in such a way that the scientifically interested layperson can understand them in an understandable way Way to be answered. The structure of the book is not like a textbook, so the reader can deal with all of the 20 questions in any order. The few but high quality black and white images are very informative. The original book design with its rounded corners and elastic band is reminiscent of that of the famous notebooks (Picasso, Hemingway!) From the Italian company Moleskine.

ekz information service

[20] Questions about fundamental problems and concepts in physics, starting with "What is physics for?" about "What is God's Particle?" up to "What is the true essence of reality?", answers the PhD physicist Michael Brooks in an understandable way, garnished with anecdotes from the history of science.

Technology Review

A book full of answers that arouse curiosity, arouse desire for further reading or let the often hated school subject physics appear in a completely new light: this little book in the series "The Big Questions" can do all of this. On top of that, it is beautifully designed and the author Michael Brooks, physicist and journalist, knows how to keep the tension high and explain it in an understandable and lively manner. ... Just reading these ... questions that Brooks deals with makes it clear that physics is a scientific discipline that always comes up against philosophical questions about our human nature. How exciting it is is shown in this book - also a really nice gift - wonderfully.

Buchkatalog.de

Big questions tend to be unanswerable. That is why they are among the great. Or is it because there are also children's questions that can drive the "big ones" to despair? ... From the origin of the universe to the question of whether we are living in a simulation - Brooks cannot answer all questions either, but he can explain them. And that's what makes the book fascinating. Anyone could think about asking children's questions with this book, too.

Aargau Newspaper

Brooks introduces this breathtaking world in a way that has probably never been done before: He makes it clear to the layman why the more astonishing questions arise with every puzzle that is solved, and thus shows why physics at the same time shows the artist's imagination and the metaphysical sense of the theologian.

Falter city magazine

Aargau Newspaper

Brooks introduces this breathtaking world in a way that has probably never been done before: He makes it clear to the layman why the more astonishing questions arise with every puzzle that is solved, and thus shows why physics at the same time shows the artist's imagination and the metaphysical sense of the theologian.

Falter city magazine

Brooks introduces this breathtaking world in a way that has probably never been done before: He makes it clear to the layman why the more astonishing questions arise with every puzzle that is solved, and thus shows why physics at the same time shows the artist's imagination and the metaphysical sense of the theologian.

Falter city magazine

Aargau Newspaper

Brooks introduces this breathtaking world in a way that has probably never been done before: He makes it clear to the layman why the more astonishing questions arise with every puzzle that is solved, and thus shows why physics at the same time shows the artist's imagination and the metaphysical sense of the theologian.

Falter city magazine

Brooks introduces this breathtaking world in a way that has probably never been done before: He makes it clear to the layman why the more astonishing questions arise with every puzzle that is solved, and thus shows why physics at the same time shows the artist's imagination and the metaphysical sense of the theologian.

Falter city magazine

Brooks introduces this breathtaking world in a way that has probably never been done before: He makes it clear to the layman why the more astonishing questions arise with every puzzle that is solved, and thus shows why physics at the same time shows the artist's imagination and the metaphysical sense of the theologian.

Falter city magazine